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sharpshoota

min lille swing breakout journal

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Er ikke kjent med det chart programvaren du bruker. Den litt lengre blå stiplede linjen, er dette din entry?
Og den grå stiplede linjen din SL? :)

 

Bare lurer siden det da blir litt lettere å følge med! :)

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Bruker Tradestation II hos Fxcm , synes den er utrolig enkel å bruke + at den er på nettet så kan logge meg på stort sett overalt.

Den blå striplede linjen er hvor prisen er akkurat nå. SL, TP og Entry er bare små grå striplede linjer med små skilt som peker på linjen.

smile.png

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Åja, takker for forklaringen! :)

 

Har ikke helt funnet ut hvilke broker jeg skal begynne med, men vil hvert fall ha tilgang til MT4 :)

Prøvd meg litt frem med MT4 og liker den hvordan jeg kan lage og sette opp ting slik jeg liker det.

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Åja, takker for forklaringen! :)

 

Har ikke helt funnet ut hvilke broker jeg skal begynne med, men vil hvert fall ha tilgang til MT4 :)

Prøvd meg litt frem med MT4 og liker den hvordan jeg kan lage og sette opp ting slik jeg liker det.

 

 

Bruker MT4 som jeg laster ned gratis. Du må bare åpne en demo konto etter at den er lastet ned. Bruker den kun for teknisk analyse, da den er veldig enkel og grei å bruke.

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ut på SL her

Så ut som en price gikk inn i consolidation periode der, døde hvertfall veldig ut..

 

 

Sundetinvest;

Ja, har førsøkt meg litt frem med MT4 og liker det godt!

Så du hadde laget det klart med parene i tabs, akkurat sånn jeg har sett for meg å legge det opp! :)

 

 

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Synes denne var fin smile.png ;

 

If I Could Teach You One Thing About Trading Success, This Is It

What if it was all wrong? The common advice you hear about trading, that is. What if it was, plain and simple, wrong? Have you ever really considered that?

You’ve been told that you need to focus on simplicity. And that you have to find a few trusted setups to execute with discipline each time they show up. And that all you need is good psychology and you’ll be profitable. But who tells you all of this? Is it professional traders who are making a living from their trading, or is it people who are trying to sell you trading education? Do you think it might be in their best interest to tell you that it’s simple and straight-forward, even when it isn’t?

Well, I’m not here to bad-mouth those people, but as a professional trader who’s made a living solely from trading, I have my own views about what trading is all about, and what it takes to achieve success. So here is what I’ve found.

Trading is not about clear-cut, straightforward simplicity. Trading is about being okay with ambiguity. It’s about tolerating confusion. It’s about sitting with discomfort and being at peace with it. It’s about not having an exact script of when to trade or not to trade, and being okay with that. It’s about exceptions to the rules. It’s about contradiction. It’s about uncertainty.

And yet traders left and right want to make it simple. They want to reduce it to a few simple setups to trade mechanically with discipline. But the market is not simple. The market is all about uncertainty, and complexity, and ambiguity. Simple setups traded mechanically could never capture that, and they can never give you a true lasting edge. So choose a different way.

Choose to learn the art of reading the markets. Learn to synthesize different elements like price action, structure, market internals, and intermarket themes, and pull them together into a contextual view. Only then can you choose to employ “simple” setups to trade with. Because only then will you know which setups to use under which conditions. And this is everything.

And don’t be fooled. Learning this is a very complex process that will take time. It turns out that psychology, while hugely important, is NOT everything. First, you need an edge. And having a consistent edge requires that you dedicate yourself to learning to read the markets and how to execute correctly in context. But it’s very possible. Many have done it before you, and this means that you too can learn it if you dedicate yourself. They had nothing that you don’t have. All they did, was to be relentless.

They didn’t spend their trading days waiting for mindless setups and indicators to line up. No. They spent their days reading the market from minute to minute, hour to hour, figuring out the odds of it doing this or that, adapting dynamically, thinking of trading ideas as the action unfolds.

Now, you’ll ask me if it’s not easier psychologically to just have simple clear setups to wait for. Absolutely. It is. But who said “easy” would make you money? The market rewards what is hard to do. It’s hard to have ambiguity surrounding your market reads. It’s hard being uncertain. It’s hard dealing with competing and sometimes conflicting signs. And yet, this is what it’s all about. You have to avoid needing things to be clear cut. Instead of running from uncertainty, train your mind to be able to better deal with it.

And keep a trading journal. But don’t fill it only with thoughts about your emotions. Let it be filled instead with your notes about market action. You’ll find my notes still in the drawer beside my bed. Over 1000 pages of them. Day after day. Week after week. Making mistakes, wrong interpretations, being clueless about how the market was acting, not knowing how I should trade, not knowing if my views made sense or not. But I continued taking notes and learning. And then, something magical happened. Market feel was born. Now I had the prerequisite to trade those “setups” they’ll tell you about.

So dedicate yourself. Dedicate yourself like you’ve never dedicated yourself before. Trading is a mental sport. You have to approach it like that. Don’t listen to the salesmen. Start building your skills. Start practicing. Make mistakes. Take losses. Be clueless. Don’t be afraid of it. It’s okay; that’s the only way you’ll progress. And trust me, progress you will.

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Meget bra skrevet denne : wink.png

 

The Difference Between Knowledge and Performance

Cognitive knowledge of how to do something is very different than managing performance during challenge. Until the learned knowledge about trading and risk is integrated into the emotions and mindset needed for peak performance in trading, then the learned knowledge is simply not available to the trader during the emotional environment of trading. The learning has not taken place in the emotional context where the performance will be measured. This is because the way you think is emotional-state-dependent.

What does this emotional learning look like to a trader? Traditionally most traders learn how to trade and manage risk while paper trading where there is no risk of loss. People can learn how to trade well and manage risk well in this emotional environment devoid of real risk. They learn the mechanics of trading, how to use their methodology, and get valuable screen time for pattern recognition. And, as they learn how to use these tools they become profitable on paper, but without the context of the downside of the risk of uncertainty.

The problem is that you cannot go to the bank and cash in your paper profits. Yet when the trader takes his or her learned skills into the arena of live trading where capital is at risk, a very different emotional environment takes over - one for which the trader is rarely trained and for which he or she is not prepared. At that moment the skills the trader learned in the emotional environment of a classroom simply are not available to him in the emotional environment that occurs while live trading, where the possibility of capital loss is real and tangible.

These are completely different emotional worlds. And the knowledge gained in the no-risk paper world is not usable until the trader adapts to the new sets of emotional skills and mindset needed for risk management where personal capital is actually being put into play. This is where emotional intelligence is far more important than head-knowledge.

Live trading exposes the fear-based mind that interprets the uncertainty of trading when capital is at risk. Depending on your beliefs about losing, you remain locked into a loser’s mind or you learn how to learn from your losses by bringing a powerfully different mindset to the ambiguity of trading.

Teasing Apart Uncertainty and Fear

A highly disciplined mind is the undercurrent that lies beneath emotional management of both methodology and platform. No one becomes successful without emotional discipline. For the vast majority of traders who want to become successful, emotional discipline is built, not found. It is not found out-there in more rules that you will not follow in the heat of trading. It is found by acknowledging your fears and re-training your beliefs so that losing becomes an opportunity to learn and grow from your mistakes – instead of trading NOT TO LOSE. In training a mind to trade, the crucial step is that you and the way you perceive (your mind) learn to embrace the uncertainty of probability. It does not come naturally. And your staying in denial about this need keeps you stuck in your self-limiting performances.

Until this happens, your brain is always going to chase certainty because that is what it has evolved to do over countless generations. Your brain is biased to believe that there is an answer that will correctly predict what the markets will do. No matter how much evidence there is to the contrary, your brain and your mind will resist probability thinking. It wants to stay in certainty thinking. This is simply not an effective mindset in trading where the illusion of control is dangerous.

Now add social adaptation to your biological pre-disposition. Most traders grow up in families, schools, and cultures where they learn to not make mistakes, to not lose, and to always be right -- and you have the perfect storm for forging a brain and mind unable to think in probability terms. So the brain and mind that you bring to trading rarely has the capacity to separate uncertainty from fear. And, sure enough, most traders fear uncertainty, which is exactly what they must manage from a probability mindset to be successful traders. If fear is linked to uncertainty, a trader has difficulty moving from paper trading to live trading. And they will continue to have problems until this linkage is disrupted and reformed by new beliefs about uncertainty, losing, and winning.

Learning, Failure, and Trading

What happens when a trade goes against you? (This will tell you a lot about what you learned about how to be successful.) In our culture being successful is associated with not making mistakes. Success is about winning...being a winner. Yet successful trading involves relearning how to lose. Because you are going to make mistakes and you are going to lose. It is the frequency of winning and losing (and the size of the winners compared to the losers) that counts. Learning from mistakes is the key to becoming a successful trader – it is what separates successful traders from inconsistent traders. The perception and beliefs you have about winning and losing will be put to the test in trading.

When you lose, do you trigger to self interpretations of inadequacy, powerlessness, and unworthiness? This will expose your faulty beliefs that link your performance with self-limiting beliefs. The fact is that the brain (and you) learn only from failure, not success. Success actually locks you into a comfort zone that keeps you from growing. People get locked into once-successful strategies and refuse to change when the strategies no longer work. That’s success for you. When you lose, you have high motivation to change. This is key. When you develop a mindset that stops attempting to avoid mistakes but, rather, becomes curious about learning from the mistake – you are on the road to probability thinking.

Learning to trade successfully is not about being smart. It is about putting probabilities in your favor and having the emotional stamina to stay in probability thinking, rather than chasing certainty as the Holy Grail. This is the mind that you need to bring to trading. You manage your risk and then move on. Loss is not a statement about the worth of your being. Loss is only about your performance in risk management. Mistakes happen, learning happens, and another trade (with greater skill) becomes possible.

It’s not really about whether you like risk or not. It is about becoming comfortable with risk. This is where uncertainty, and its management, is separated from fear. And it is where the journey of a trader moves from the need for certainty to the management of the ambiguity of the uncertainty of trading in the markets. What mindset do you bring to uncertainty, ambiguity, and losing in trading? The effectiveness of the beliefs behind that mindset will be found in the balance of your trading account.

Rande Howell

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Meget bra skrevet denne : wink.png

 

The Difference Between Knowledge and Performance

Cognitive knowledge of how to do something is very different than managing performance during challenge. Until the learned knowledge about trading and risk is integrated into the emotions and mindset needed for peak performance in trading, then the learned knowledge is simply not available to the trader during the emotional environment of trading. The learning has not taken place in the emotional context where the performance will be measured. This is because the way you think is emotional-state-dependent.

What does this emotional learning look like to a trader? Traditionally most traders learn how to trade and manage risk while paper trading where there is no risk of loss. People can learn how to trade well and manage risk well in this emotional environment devoid of real risk. They learn the mechanics of trading, how to use their methodology, and get valuable screen time for pattern recognition. And, as they learn how to use these tools they become profitable on paper, but without the context of the downside of the risk of uncertainty.

The problem is that you cannot go to the bank and cash in your paper profits. Yet when the trader takes his or her learned skills into the arena of live trading where capital is at risk, a very different emotional environment takes over - one for which the trader is rarely trained and for which he or she is not prepared. At that moment the skills the trader learned in the emotional environment of a classroom simply are not available to him in the emotional environment that occurs while live trading, where the possibility of capital loss is real and tangible.

These are completely different emotional worlds. And the knowledge gained in the no-risk paper world is not usable until the trader adapts to the new sets of emotional skills and mindset needed for risk management where personal capital is actually being put into play. This is where emotional intelligence is far more important than head-knowledge.

Live trading exposes the fear-based mind that interprets the uncertainty of trading when capital is at risk. Depending on your beliefs about losing, you remain locked into a loser’s mind or you learn how to learn from your losses by bringing a powerfully different mindset to the ambiguity of trading.

Teasing Apart Uncertainty and Fear

A highly disciplined mind is the undercurrent that lies beneath emotional management of both methodology and platform. No one becomes successful without emotional discipline. For the vast majority of traders who want to become successful, emotional discipline is built, not found. It is not found out-there in more rules that you will not follow in the heat of trading. It is found by acknowledging your fears and re-training your beliefs so that losing becomes an opportunity to learn and grow from your mistakes – instead of trading NOT TO LOSE. In training a mind to trade, the crucial step is that you and the way you perceive (your mind) learn to embrace the uncertainty of probability. It does not come naturally. And your staying in denial about this need keeps you stuck in your self-limiting performances.

Until this happens, your brain is always going to chase certainty because that is what it has evolved to do over countless generations. Your brain is biased to believe that there is an answer that will correctly predict what the markets will do. No matter how much evidence there is to the contrary, your brain and your mind will resist probability thinking. It wants to stay in certainty thinking. This is simply not an effective mindset in trading where the illusion of control is dangerous.

Now add social adaptation to your biological pre-disposition. Most traders grow up in families, schools, and cultures where they learn to not make mistakes, to not lose, and to always be right -- and you have the perfect storm for forging a brain and mind unable to think in probability terms. So the brain and mind that you bring to trading rarely has the capacity to separate uncertainty from fear. And, sure enough, most traders fear uncertainty, which is exactly what they must manage from a probability mindset to be successful traders. If fear is linked to uncertainty, a trader has difficulty moving from paper trading to live trading. And they will continue to have problems until this linkage is disrupted and reformed by new beliefs about uncertainty, losing, and winning.

Learning, Failure, and Trading

What happens when a trade goes against you? (This will tell you a lot about what you learned about how to be successful.) In our culture being successful is associated with not making mistakes. Success is about winning...being a winner. Yet successful trading involves relearning how to lose. Because you are going to make mistakes and you are going to lose. It is the frequency of winning and losing (and the size of the winners compared to the losers) that counts. Learning from mistakes is the key to becoming a successful trader – it is what separates successful traders from inconsistent traders. The perception and beliefs you have about winning and losing will be put to the test in trading.

When you lose, do you trigger to self interpretations of inadequacy, powerlessness, and unworthiness? This will expose your faulty beliefs that link your performance with self-limiting beliefs. The fact is that the brain (and you) learn only from failure, not success. Success actually locks you into a comfort zone that keeps you from growing. People get locked into once-successful strategies and refuse to change when the strategies no longer work. That’s success for you. When you lose, you have high motivation to change. This is key. When you develop a mindset that stops attempting to avoid mistakes but, rather, becomes curious about learning from the mistake – you are on the road to probability thinking.

Learning to trade successfully is not about being smart. It is about putting probabilities in your favor and having the emotional stamina to stay in probability thinking, rather than chasing certainty as the Holy Grail. This is the mind that you need to bring to trading. You manage your risk and then move on. Loss is not a statement about the worth of your being. Loss is only about your performance in risk management. Mistakes happen, learning happens, and another trade (with greater skill) becomes possible.

It’s not really about whether you like risk or not. It is about becoming comfortable with risk. This is where uncertainty, and its management, is separated from fear. And it is where the journey of a trader moves from the need for certainty to the management of the ambiguity of the uncertainty of trading in the markets. What mindset do you bring to uncertainty, ambiguity, and losing in trading? The effectiveness of the beliefs behind that mindset will be found in the balance of your trading account.

Rande Howell

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Brukt uka som har gått til bittelitt demo-trades og mest testing.

Har testet gull (xau/usd) fra 2001 fram til 2009 en plass... ok resultater, rundt 50% vinnere med risk/reward 1/2

Det som virkelig gjør ting vrient er når man får de dårlige periodene som drar kapitalen ned bortimot 50%... Noe som er vanskelig å kjempe seg igjennom på live tradingen. De dukker opp innimellom og får de aller fleste til å tvile på strategien de bruker.

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Skjermdump fra 2014-07-09 14:22:37.png

 

Bare 2 trades denne uka ...denne long usd/sgd shorten som gikk til TP og den tidligere nevnte nzd/usd long som fortsatt beveger seg.

 

Varmt om dagene nå...

Neste uke har jeg ferie og prioriterer familien så ingen trading da, skal heller kose meg i sola med ei god bok, spise mye herlig mat og bade. cool.png

 

Ønsker alle en riktig god sommer!

DSC_1337.jpg

 

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